As I wrote in the previous post there are two ways to run precompiled .NET code in Azure Functions - .NET 4.6.x or .NET Core. Why did I decide to go with the old .NET runtime? For the current moment, F# on .NET Core does not support type providers (there is a workaround, but I didn’t want to go with it for the current moment). I went to work thinking that it will be a breeze. Just attach the repo and keep on coding. It turned out that I learned more Azure Functions troubleshooting and below is the shortened version.

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Trying to understand how to run code in Azure Functions is not an easy task since this product has evolved on its own and thanks to the rise of .NET Core. This post will give You a history background necessary to understand the documentation and, most of all, all the blog posts talking about Azure Functions.

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Previously I’ve wrote about key-value databases. They are awesome - ultra-fast, simple, can scale almost linear with the number of nodes. So why bother with complicating them?

Well, they have some issues.

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The previous post laid out the most minimum requirements for something to be called a database. While they may be too bare bones for many, there are a lot of databases that don’t fulfill even half of them, and this isn’t stopping from using them on a daily basis.

The last time I’ve looked at files, this time something a bit more complex - key-value databases.

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The world of databases is a fascinating topic. It is very diverse. Many of them are extremely complex systems, but there are also very simple ones. There are the general purpose ones, and ones that do only one thing good, but they do it excelent. Despite all of this we tend to pick them just like we order food in a restaurant:

  • I’ll take the same as last time. It wasn’t ideal for what I wanted, but I could pick worse.
  • Hmm… Everyone is taking this one, so I’ll take it also.

Well, maybe it is time to dig deeper into it?

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